Tuesday, September 1, 2009

Teaser Tuesday: The Wise Heart, again

I've had a little trouble today deciding what to pick my teaser from. I am currently between books, having finished a Gerald Durrell the day before yesterday and two Ranma 1/2 volumes last night (it's terribly hard to tease from manga, anyway). I have The Crow by Alison Croggon downstairs, but I'm hesitant to pick it up today because I suspect I will need a day or two so I can read it all at once, and I'm working this evening and all day tomorrow. Can I say, though, that I like having to plan the reading of a book around the fact that I know I won't want to put it down once I start?

I've got a couple of things on the way from the library, too, hopefully to arrive today before I'm at work this evening.

But, since I am still reading it (slowly, slowly -- I'm going to have to get my own copy, I can't just keep renewing the library's, and I do like this book a lot) I thought I'd post a teaser from The Wise Heart again.

From The Wise Heart by Jack Kornfield, p72:

Now we have to wrestle with one of the deepest and most demanding aspects of Buddhist psychology, the experience of non-self. Ajahn Chah said, "You have conconsider and contemplate this slowly; you can't just think about this or your head will explode."


Well said, Ajahn Chah. Well said.

Teaser Tuesdays are hosted by Should Be Reading. It works as follows:
  • Grab your current read.
  • Open to a random page.
  • Share two teaser sentences from somewhere on that page.
  • Be careful not to include spoilers!
  • Include the title and author.

5 comments:

Susan B. Evans said...

Hmmm... Looks interesting :) Great teaser this week! My teaser accompanies a giveaway on my blog this week.

Krista said...

Ha, ha, too funny! Great teaser!

celi.a said...

It does sound like a sort of slow read... :-P Hope you enjoy the rest of it! Nice teaser, too, by the by.

mandy said...

haha, too true. Although it would be funny to see happen.

kiirstin said...

Thanks everyone! I am looking forward to the rest of it. Kornfield does have a lovely, gentle sense of humour that lightens things up, especially when they need to be lightened.